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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
that the dream is far from being realized. with the once mighty city of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hung erling for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't his torically black colleges and universities desperate for stability, be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these. as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thoug
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
: and it's a dream that still lives on 50 years later. edith drove to d.c. from detroit for this week's commemoration and she brought her granddaughters with her. >> i wanted my granddaughters to see what i saw 50 years ago. to stand up for what's right. >> reporter: the struggles then and those to come draw john lewis back as well. you still come here often. >> oh, yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i come here to reflect, to remember. >> reporter: remembering his old friend, and the day that both made history and changed it. >> this spot is almost sacred. dr. king must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new america. lewis believes america has come far in 50 years. many issues still exist. progress, he says, just a down payment on the dream. what was at stake that day? >> the future of america as one nation. as one people. it was at stake. he helped hold us together. >> reporter: is there one moment from that day that sticks out in your mind most? >> he started saying let freedom ring. let freedom ring. from stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mol
people have strong 04. you cannot rob people in detroit of their pensions. if we stand by while they take their pensions, they will take our pensions. don't think it will happen -- will happen to us. they will do it again. inequality is a skirt on our society. and -- a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about $7 an hour workers and we got to do something about it, but on this side of it, some people are doing pretty good. between 1979 and 2007, a time frame of all of a less than 20 years, real income went up by the 240% for those in the top 1%. it is a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. we've got to fight back. our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we cannot do it while we are getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas. they just leaned on us a few months ago for this south. deal that they said would create jobs. the -- this south korea deal that they said would create jobs. it has already cost jobs. i'm not against trade. but these are not really trade deals, but i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)